It doesn’t have to be crazy at work – quick book review

I usually stick to one book and finish it before moving on, but this book grabbed my attention instantly. Firstly because I love the way the authors run their company. They are so unconventional and so intentional at the same time. So I dropped my current book (The Undoing Project) and jumped into this book.

What an amazing book. From it, I hoped to learn more about the philosophy behind running calm companies and teams. The approach affects everything from pricing products, arranging teams, growing the company and even how tonot raise money.

All the chapters are titled around one aspect of how to run a calm company. My favorite chapters were:

  1. Jomo (Joy of missing out)
  2. Promise not to promise
  3. Benefits Who? – Have real benefits not gimicks
  4. Don’t Negotiate Salaries – pay in the top 5% and don’t compromise on that
  5. Don’t cheat sleep – you need the energy to be productive
  6. The trust battery – how to increase trust

Every piece of advice was based on experience and a proven track record. The way the book is written makes it easy to digest.

There was one thing that I didn’t like about this book. They use curse words all the time. I understand the point they try to make but you can use other words with very similar impact, besides this each chapter bring the point across very well.

If you want to run a company or team without all the fluff industries add then you should read this book. If you one day want to start an effective company, you should read this book. If you need more calm in your work-life, go ahead, read this book.


Other posts you may also enjoy:

Giving Advice Doesn’t Work, I found a better way

I was recently chatting to a friend. He mentioned some area where he was not succeeding . I had the perfect answer. If he’d only follow my advice.

I make this mistake all too often. I can see it in people’s response. They fell insulted or just irritated that I would try to give advice. I do it sincerely but it always backfires.

I realized that Giving People Advice Rarely Works.

I found this helpful, maybe you will too
— Read on www.google.co.za/amp/s/www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/do-the-right-thing/201407/giving-people-advice-rarely-works-does?amp

The most gifted books from the tribe of mentors

I read Tribe of Mentors, a year ago, and wrote down all the recommended books. I made notes on these books as I wanted to see if there are commonalities between the things highly successful people read. To no surprise, I found that many of the mentors recommended the same books.

I thought it would be helpful to create a list of the top ten recommended books. This list is in order of most occurrences and according to my naive method for counting and making notes.

I write this mainly for myself. A reminder of books to purchase for my Library. I still believe good books are worth way more than the paper they are printed on and that re-reading books is the key to finding more value from in them.

  1. Man’s search for meaning

2. The rational optimist

3. Poor charlies almanack

4. The alchimist by Paulo Coelho

5. Song of Solomon by Tonin Morrison

6. Open society and its enemies

7. Making sense of people by San barondes

8. Changing on the Job by Jennifer Garvey Berger

9. In over our heads by Robert Kegan

10. The war of art by Steven Pressfield

11. Leadership on the line.

5 Quotes to ponder on from Tribe Mentors

I wrote a quick review on the book, A tribe of mentors, but wanted to go into more detail and give you some of the quotes that that really hit home for me. I chose 5 of them to share with you.

I truly found a lot of value in this book. If you are interested, go ahead and read my quick review here and then get a copy for yourself.

1. Perspective and focus:

“It is not what you look at that matters, it is what you see.”

Henry David Thoreau

2. Good decisions:

“Hard choices, easy life, easy choices hard life”

Jerzy Gregory

3. Being true:

“Integrity is the only path where you will never get lost”.

Mike Maples Jr.

4. Hanging around the right people:

“It is the quality of your relationships that determine the quality of your life”

Esther Perel

5. On taking action:

“To avoid criticism, say nothing, do nothing, be nothing”

Elbert Hubbard

a brilliant talk on how to prepare for success

I watched this talk and it answered most of the questions I had about how to succeed and make an impact.

The talk is titled “You and your research/career”, implying your career is something to be studied.

You should watch it yourself, but for me, the main take away is: “Work on important things with important people”.

I hope you learn something that inspires you to take charge of your career. Where do you want to be, who do you want to work with and what kind of legacy do you want to leave behind.

I got this talk from: Must-See Tech Talks for Every Programmer

Programming well with others

I watched a funny but interesting talk about working well with others.

An important take away from this video is:

  • It’s not about how smart you look, but what impact you can make with others

You can find many other great pieces of advice in the video. It is done in a very interesting manner. They’r taking “live” calls!

I got this from Must-See Tech Talks for Every Programmer.

The Psychology of Money

Let me tell you the story of two investors, neither of whom knew each other, but whose paths crossed in an interesting way….

…. Some people are born into families that encourage education; others are against it. Some are born into flourishing economies encouraging of entrepreneurship; others are born into war and destitution. I want you to be successful, and I want you to earn it. But realize that not all success is due to hard work, and not all poverty is due to laziness. Keep this in mind when judging people, including yourself.
— Read on www.collaborativefund.com/blog/the-psychology-of-money/

Is enough, enough?

When is enough enough? How long are we delaying our lives as we struggle for someone else’s picture of perfection? How many more years should we put into building a fortune, for our old age? We all need to read the story below na make up our one minds.

The Mexican Fisherman and the Investment Banker (Author Unknown)

An American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.

The Mexican replied, “only a little while.”

The American then asked why didn’t he stay out longer and catch more fish?

The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.

The American then asked, “but what do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siestas with my wife, Maria, and stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine, and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life.”

The American scoffed. “I have an MBA from Harvard, and can help you,” he said. “You should spend more time fishing, and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat, you could buy several boats, and eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middle-man, you could sell directly to the processor, eventually opening up your own cannery. You could control the product, processing, and distribution,” he said. “Of course, you would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and eventually to New York City, where you will run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied, “Oh, 15 to 20 years or so.”

“But what then?” asked the Mexican.

The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time was right, you would announce an IPO, and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions!”

“Millions – then what?”

The American said, “Then you could retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you could sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siestas with your wife, and stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play guitar with your amigos.”

Source: http://renewablewealth.com/the-parable-of-the-mexican-fisherman/

I came across this story while reading: https://m.signalvnoise.com/enough-1d48019c7335