Habits of Highly effective Software Engineers

Valuable advice from the “Tech Lead”. A career in software engineering is a long term game, it’s a marathon, not a sprint. Having habits like these, ensure that you’re preserving yourself as you grow in experience and influence.

  1. Healthy Lifestyle, exercise, water and nutrition. Keep a good posture.
  2. Good Sleep routines.
  3. Continual learning. Keep your skills sharp.
  4. Have result-oriented work ethic. Focus on being effective, get work done.
  5. Keep things simple. For yourself and others. Complexity works against you.
  6. Create periods of deep work in your day.
  7. Collaborate with other programmers to save time and effort

One liner for importing multiple SQL files using WP CLI DB command

In some cases, SQL backups break exports into multiple files, usualy by table name.

I wanted to import all the files in one go and figured googled my way to this “one liner”:

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One year at the helm of Vim

One year ago I started using an old text editor called Vim. I’m happy to say that I’m still sticking with it. I’m now very comfortable with VIM and more empowered translate Ideas into working solutions.

In this year I’ve become accustomed to working the terminal, embracing the VIM way while realizing that that coding is just one part of the challenge.

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Imposters handbook: a quick review

A year ago I read the imposters handbook. It seemed like this book was specifically for people like me. The found himself in the same position I was in: Feeling like an imposter.

I read this book a year ago, but it took me this long to write something about it as I was lacking the daily discipline of working on my blog probably related to the same imposter feeling.

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a brilliant talk on how to prepare for success

I watched this talk and it answered most of the questions I had about how to succeed and make an impact.

The talk is titled “You and your research/career”, implying your career is something to be studied.

You should watch it yourself, but for me, the main take away is: “Work on important things with important people”.

I hope you learn something that inspires you to take charge of your career. Where do you want to be, who do you want to work with and what kind of legacy do you want to leave behind.

I got this talk from: Must-See Tech Talks for Every Programmer

Programming well with others

I watched a funny but interesting talk about working well with others.

An important take away from this video is:

  • It’s not about how smart you look, but what impact you can make with others

You can find many other great pieces of advice in the video. It is done in a very interesting manner. They’r taking “live” calls!

I got this from Must-See Tech Talks for Every Programmer.

When are you proficient in a programming language?

Learning a programming language gives you the opportunity to explore other problem domains alongside new approaches to addressing familiar problems.

I write this as I was looking for the answer to exactly this question. There were many opinions that had me confused, some from ancient rockstar ninjas who command CPUS at will and others from earnest people who are also seeking.

Why would one ask such a question in the first place? It seems like the actual issue is 2 fold. For me it is firstly; when can this go on my resume. Secondly and probably more specific to me: when to move on to the next language or skill. When can I check off my to-do list and say that I know a programming language?

After looking at many other ideas, In my opinion: You are proficient in a language when you are able to read, understand and debug code along with deploying to production.

If you can read, write and execute you are well on your way and I would consider this profecient. Beyond this, optionally, persue mastery. Though in order to keep a language on your resume, make sure to continually read, understand and debug.

Link to other opinions: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/154862/at-what-point-can-i-say-ive-learned-a-language

Take a Nap, Change your life Book Review

I used to ascribe to the phrase: “sleep when you die”, but to what benefit? Hustling? Working hard? That may seem like the best thing to do now, but it may take 3 times as long for you to reach your goals, if you are burnt out, as you make a lot of mistakes in this state.

The title of this book grabbed my attention. Who doesn’t what to change their lives for the better? I guess most of us do, so the things I take form this book was exactly what I expeceted: Working smart and sharpening your most valued tool, the mind, is simply one of the best things you can do for your better future.

The book teaches that napping has many benefits and encourages you to incorporate a nap into your daily routine. On regular days, a short nap will do, but on days when you feel more exhausted taking a longer one is perfectly fine.

The short 20-minute nap gives you a boost in energy and alertness, which is good for motor learning skills. The longer 90-minute nap gives you a full sleep cycle, improved emotional state, and procedural memory, this also helps with new connections in the brain. Source for more data.

What I didn’t like about the book. I was expecting a 5 pager to be honest. Give me all the good stuff and let me go to bed right now. The book focuses on education around sleep in general. It makes a short hit at the naps and how to do it. The main focus is on understanding how sleep works.

You should read this book, if you want to undrestand why napping is important and how your sleep cycles work.

This book may not change your life, but applying the principles may have an exponential impact on your health, happiness and possibly even bank account.

Creative Computer Science

I read an interesting article on how personal development as a Software Engineer should be largely focused on thinking rather than specific technologies.

To add to this, when you happen upon the new shiny tool, language or technology you should look at it and try to decipher the underlying ideas and concepts that allow it to exist.

We need to focus more on ideas and less on implementation and specific technologies.

Link: https://www.ybrikman.com/writing/2014/05/19/dont-learn-to-code-learn-to-think/