Why I no longer call them goals

Calling your goals, “goals”, leaves you at a disadvantage. From now on, I suggest that you call them outcomes.

Let me tell you why. An article in the New York Times spells it out clearly: names have power. The way in which we speak about things affects our brains.

The term “goals”, has multiple meanings, depending on the context. In one way it means where you’d like to be, but in many other instances, it can mean, dreams, vision or desire. A wish, far off, into the future. Goals also have you thinking about the end result and not so much on how to get there.

Calling your goal an outcome, automatically implies that, for something to come out, something must go in. Your mind starts to wonder about how, and as research has shown, we solve problems in our sleep. The more you think about your outcomes the more you are likely to work towards them.

I have made a decision. I will only put my dreams on my outcomes list if I have attached a new habit to it. Want to lose weight? Add the habits of a better diet and regular exercise. Want to earn more money? Attach the habit of developing your skills and reading. If the outcome is worth pursuing the habit is worth cultivating.

If what you are thinking about is truly a “goal”, try something more specific, like dream, vision or desire, but don’t call them goals.

Featured image by Andrey Larin https://unsplash.com/photos/Kodkas71tT8

Is enough, enough?

When is enough enough? How long are we delaying our lives as we struggle for someone else’s picture of perfection? How many more years should we put into building a fortune, for our old age? We all need to read the story below na make up our one minds.

The Mexican Fisherman and the Investment Banker (Author Unknown)

An American investment banker was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.

The Mexican replied, “only a little while.”

The American then asked why didn’t he stay out longer and catch more fish?

The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.

The American then asked, “but what do you do with the rest of your time?”

The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siestas with my wife, Maria, and stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine, and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life.”

The American scoffed. “I have an MBA from Harvard, and can help you,” he said. “You should spend more time fishing, and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat, you could buy several boats, and eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middle-man, you could sell directly to the processor, eventually opening up your own cannery. You could control the product, processing, and distribution,” he said. “Of course, you would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and eventually to New York City, where you will run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But, how long will this all take?”

To which the American replied, “Oh, 15 to 20 years or so.”

“But what then?” asked the Mexican.

The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time was right, you would announce an IPO, and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions!”

“Millions – then what?”

The American said, “Then you could retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you could sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take siestas with your wife, and stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play guitar with your amigos.”

Source: http://renewablewealth.com/the-parable-of-the-mexican-fisherman/

I came across this story while reading: https://m.signalvnoise.com/enough-1d48019c7335