Golang Channels: explained simply

I see go channels as a pipe connecting two air tight vacuum cleaners. One vacuum cleaner can not push anything into the pipe, if the other vacuum is not pulling from the pipe. Both need to do the opposite action. If one sends the “package” will be stuck until the other turns on it’s receiving action.

Channels can contain multiple slots for “holding” the “packages”.

Pushing more into the pipe than wha the pipe can handle results in a broken pipe.

I also think of it as a queue, first in, first out ( last in last out ). The only difference is this one is ultra sensitive and very particular.

Colemak Keyboard Layout, 1 Month(ish) In

Typing is one of the most important aspects of my professional career.  That’s why, a month ago, I decided to change my keyboard layout to Colemak.

The first hurdle I faced was switching in December, what a weird time to switch right?  I was supposed to be scaling down and focus on relaxation, but I thought the switch to be such a huge challenge, that It wouldn’t matter when I did it.

The second hurdle: I went cold turkey. I simply switched, printed out the new layout, gave it a solid glance and memorized all the new positions and kept it next to my desk. I watched my typing speed go from 35 WPM(words per minute) to 9. And my frustration levels go into the red.

I started to use this at work immediately. I warned my team mates and just jumped in. A good thing this sort of thing is encouraged at Automattic.

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Learning the new layout.

The two things that helped me the most during the first month was Type Fu and a supportive team.

With Type Fu you repeatedly type similar phrases until you “master the keys. At this point, you move on to the next level with more variation. It also has a setting to select the keys you battle with and only focus on them.

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Doing typing drills in Type Fu

My current speed is 30 WPM. I use it as my default layout and I’m way more confident than I was a month ago. My main take away is that, if I can go from 9 -30WPM in a month then I’ll be more productive as time goes on.

I hope to increase this as I continue to practice every working day.

Ableton, software engineering behind the music

Often times, one forgets that the tools you and other people use actually have people just like you working hard to ship the nex improved version.

It is quite interesting to see how the developers work to produce such an amazing tool used by many renowned DJ’s and producers.