The most gifted books from the tribe of mentors

I read Tribe of Mentors, a year ago, and wrote down all the recommended books. I made notes on these books as I wanted to see if there are commonalities between the things highly successful people read. To no surprise, I found that many of the mentors recommended the same books.

I thought it would be helpful to create a list of the top ten recommended books. This list is in order of most occurrences and according to my naive method for counting and making notes.

I write this mainly for myself. A reminder of books to purchase for my Library. I still believe good books are worth way more than the paper they are printed on and that re-reading books is the key to finding more value from in them.

  1. Man’s search for meaning

2. The rational optimist

3. Poor charlies almanack

4. The alchimist by Paulo Coelho

5. Song of Solomon by Tonin Morrison

6. Open society and its enemies

7. Making sense of people by San barondes

8. Changing on the Job by Jennifer Garvey Berger

9. In over our heads by Robert Kegan

10. The war of art by Steven Pressfield

11. Leadership on the line.

5 Quotes to ponder on from Tribe Mentors

I wrote a quick review on the book, A tribe of mentors, but wanted to go into more detail and give you some of the quotes that that really hit home for me. I chose 5 of them to share with you.

I truly found a lot of value in this book. If you are interested, go ahead and read my quick review here and then get a copy for yourself.

1. Perspective and focus:

“It is not what you look at that matters, it is what you see.”

Henry David Thoreau

2. Good decisions:

“Hard choices, easy life, easy choices hard life”

Jerzy Gregory

3. Being true:

“Integrity is the only path where you will never get lost”.

Mike Maples Jr.

4. Hanging around the right people:

“It is the quality of your relationships that determine the quality of your life”

Esther Perel

5. On taking action:

“To avoid criticism, say nothing, do nothing, be nothing”

Elbert Hubbard

Imposters handbook: a quick review

A year ago I read the imposters handbook. It seemed like this book was specifically for people like me. The found himself in the same position I was in: Feeling like an imposter.

I read this book a year ago, but it took me this long to write something about it as I was lacking the daily discipline of working on my blog probably related to the same imposter feeling.

I felt like an imposter and, at times, probably still, but I’m way more confident now after I realized that everyone else feels the same way. The book showed me that feeling like an imposter is normal but that it doesn’t mean that you should continuously take the back seat and let another lead the way as you think you don’t belong.

This book is a great starter for people, like me, who did not do a Computer Science degree. It is a basic introduction to many relevant topics, but you may want to dive even deeper into those that you encounter more often.

You will find topics you may never ever need, but it’s simply nice to be familiar with what these are and that you can smile and nod without blatantly faking it.

A year later I notice that version 2, with Scott Hanselman, is out and it looks promising:imposters_handbook_season2Link to Imposters Handbook Season 2

I would encourage anyone working in technology or with an interest in programming to read this. It has certainly given me a great deal of comfort knowing that I can now understand some CS concepts that evaded me in the past. 

Tribe of Mentors: Quick Review

The book contains 100+ interviews with highly successful people, the mentors. These people share their best advice and struggles.

If you don’t like reading, this is the perfect book for you. You can start at any point and stop where you like.

In this book Tim Ferris asks all mentors the same set of questions. Some people chose to only answer a subset of the question and others used their creativity to see the questions from a different perspective, which I found most interesting.

Tribe of Mentors contains various interpretations of the word “success”: Financial, professional and health to name a few. You will find that, not all the interviews appeal to you, but there are quite a few pearls of wisdom.

There were so many commonalities between the answers. One of the more noticeable things were Meditation, they all practice some form of it.  It was also interesting to see lots of repeating advice, which shows that there are only a hand full of fundamentals that you need to practice in order to become successful.

One thing I really don’t like about this book is that it consists primarily of Americans, to truly be a tribe you need people from the African continent. Well not really, but you know what I mean. I would have loved a more global approach.

The most Important habits that almost all the mentors practice are:

  1. Reading
  2. Meditating
  3. Exercising

I also learnt about a few interesting products:

 

I have taken some more notes that I will share with you going forward. This will cover the top quotes, best advice and top interviews from my perspective.

My favourite. quote from this book, which really bring everything together is:

“It is the quality of your relationships that determine the quality of your life” – Esther Perel